Thin Films

Thin Films

Both Dr. Tania Claudio Weber and Dr. Dieter Weber have worked extensively with deposition and characterization of thin films. We provide solutions to common issues, such as delamination, cracking, roughness, inhomogeneity, or poor functional properties. Our team has already co-optimized thin film systems for biocompatibility, adhesion, smoothness, hardness, wear-resistance, crack-resistance, electrical conductivity, electrical contact resistance, chemical stability, as well as passivating and sealing properties based on an in-depth understanding of the relationship between deposition methods and resulting properties. The methods for metals, semiconductors and ceramics range from chemical methods, such as plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and electroplating, to physical methods like pulsed laser deposition (PLD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), sputtering, reactive sputtering and high-pressure oxygen sputtering for epitaxial, amorphous and polycrystalline films. Optimal properties are often only reached with pre-treatment and post-treatment steps, such as chemical treatments, plasma cleaning and surface activation, annealing, and polishing. Bond Consulting helps you to find an ideal combination for your application. Our services also include practical aspects around thin film deposition, such as help with ceramic sputter target bonding for optimal reliability and service life time, and consulting regarding high-vacuum equipment.

We have experience with a wide range of characterization methods for thin films. Based on your application, we can choose between scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize and measure surface morphology. We use XRD to determine phase, composition, roughness, crystallographic orientation, texture, and thickness non-destructively for epitaxial and polycrystalline films. TEM can be used for cross-sectional analysis, mechanical properties are tested with methods such microindentation and pull-off adhesion testing, and conductivity is measured electrically.